update from the blogosphere…

'Accumulative Identity’ by Jodi Keet

'Accumulative Identity’ by Jodi Keet

It’s been a lovely Easter and I hope everyone has been having a ‘smashing’ time! (gettit, smashing eggs…?)

Anyway, now I’m back at my coputer, with a sea of RSS to wade through, I’d thought I’d highlight the more interesting news from the art world…here they are:

‘Accumulative Identity’ by Jodi Keet,  a showcase of her MFA portrait work   26th March – 8th April, Brunswick Street Gallery, Melbourne.

LINK

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Nine-year-old Kim Phuc after an aerial napalm attack in south  Vietnam. Photograph: Nick Ut/AP

Nine-year-old Kim Phuc after an aerial napalm attack in south Vietnam. Photograph: Nick Ut/AP

Photography’s bodies of evidence

Ever since its inception, the mortal ambivalence of photography has been evident – as has its propensity for deception.

“Dead and alive, the human body has perpetually hovered on the mortal threshold between visibility and disappearance that frames every photograph.”

MORE/LINK

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Circular logic ... Google deems Spiral Jetty (1970) to be Robert Smithson's most popular work. Photograph: George Steinmetz/Corbis

Circular logic ... Google deems Spiral Jetty (1970) to be Robert Smithson's most popular work. Photograph: George Steinmetz/Corbis

Can Google gauge the greatest art?

The search engine may list only obvious artworks – and a limited number at that – but it’s hard to argue with its taste.

“What’s more worrying is the lack of correlation between the immense online archive of art and the even more immense reality. Because so many works can be found online, there’s a danger of forgetting how many cannot (not to mention the inadequacy of a picture on your screen compared with the real thing). A student can’t really research a dissertation on art from digital sources alone, however tempting the illusion. And there lies the real vice of Google.”

MORE/LINK

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Longed-for clunkiness ... Patti Smith with a Polaroid. Photograph: AGF s.r.l/Rex Features

Longed-for clunkiness ... Patti Smith with a Polaroid. Photograph: AGF s.r.l/Rex Features

The Polaroid revival

Thanks to the Impossible Project, run by three Polaroid enthusiastists, the beauty and banality of film that ‘develops in the palm of your hand’ is being kept alive.

“The Impossible Project took its name from a quote by Edwin Land, the man credited with the invention of instant photography. “Don’t undertake a project”, Land once said, “unless it is manifestly important and nearly impossible”.”

MORE/LINK

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Thomas Ruff-jpegs

Thomas Ruff-jpegs

Review of Thomas Ruff Lecture at Massey University

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